forms

Who Owns Data?

Who Owns the Data? By David Brauner, Editor Here’s a riddle: what do the following have in common: copyrighting appraisals, the Intended User/Intended Use provision in USPAP, Item 21 on the Fannie Mae form, data mining and the FNC lawsuit, automated appraisals (AMVs), and perhaps, the future of appraising? Apparently, they have everything in common.… Read More

Fannie’s New Forms: Something to Talk About

Fannie’s New Forms: Something To Talk About The latest version of the new Fannie Forms are set to go into use soon. These forms for appraising single-family residential and small income-producing properties have some very disturbing and questionable requirements within the certification pages. One of the biggest concerns for appraisers is items #21. If you… Read More

Risks of Changing Intended User Statements

Editor’s Note: Here is a question (and answer), concerning the proper intended user statement when the form and intended use conflict with one another. Scope of Work: Q&A by David Braun, MAI, SRA Risks of Changing Intended User Statements (Question from Howard Goheen, Phoenix Appraisal Service) “Dear David (Braun)…We’ve worked hard to get up to… Read More

Fannie Offers Cert #23 “Fix”

Fannie offers Cert #23 “Fix” By David Brauner, Editor WRE Just days after the new forms took effect and in the midst of widespread confusion and fear among appraisers nationwide regarding their increasing liability and responsibility under the new forms, and especially Cert. #23 (Intended User), Fannie Mae’s Mark Simpson, speaking to appraisers at Valuation… Read More

Cost Approach: Why Sidestepping it Can be Costly

Cost Approach Why Sidestepping it Can be Costly By Gretchen Gary and Richard Vishanoff “I don’t like using the cost approach. It’s too time consuming. Market-based appraisals are always more reliable. Besides, I’m not required to include the cost approach in my appraisals. It’s not relevant anymore.” Sound familiar? If you’re skipping the cost approach,… Read More